Fox Facts and Dream Data #2

Some more tidbits to inspire your potential poems on foxes and/or dreams.

Fox Facts:

On the Etymology

The Modern English word “fox” is Old English, and comes from the Proto-Germanic word fukh – compare German Fuchs, Gothic fauho, Old Norse foa and Dutch vos. It corresponds to the Proto-Indo-European word puk– meaning “tail of it” (compare Sanskrit puccha, also “tail”). The bushy tail is also the source of the word for fox in Welsh: llwynog, from llwyn, “bush, grove”.[1] Lithuanian: uodegis, from uodega, “tail”, Portuguese: raposa, from rabo, “tail”[2] and Ojibwa: waagosh, from waa, which refers to the up and down “bounce” or flickering of an animal or its tail.[3] Male foxes are known as dogs or reynards, females as vixens, and young as kits, pups or cubs. A group of foxes is a “skulk”, “troop” or “earth”.

Dream Data:

From the Wikipedia page on dreams:

The average person has about 3 to 5 dreams per night, but some may have up to 7 dreams in one night. The dreams tend to last longer as the night progresses. During a full 8-hour night sleep, two hours of it is spent dreaming. […] The earliest recorded dreams were acquired from materials dating back approximately 5000 years, in Mesopotamia, where they were documented on clay tablets.[5] In the Greek and Roman periods, the people believed that dreams were direct messages from the gods, or from the dead and that they predicted the future.

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