Fox Facts and Dream Data #2

Some more tidbits to inspire your potential poems on foxes and/or dreams.

Fox Facts:

On the Etymology

The Modern English word “fox” is Old English, and comes from the Proto-Germanic word fukh – compare German Fuchs, Gothic fauho, Old Norse foa and Dutch vos. It corresponds to the Proto-Indo-European word puk– meaning “tail of it” (compare Sanskrit puccha, also “tail”). The bushy tail is also the source of the word for fox in Welsh: llwynog, from llwyn, “bush, grove”.[1] Lithuanian: uodegis, from uodega, “tail”, Portuguese: raposa, from rabo, “tail”[2] and Ojibwa: waagosh, from waa, which refers to the up and down “bounce” or flickering of an animal or its tail.[3] Male foxes are known as dogs or reynards, females as vixens, and young as kits, pups or cubs. A group of foxes is a “skulk”, “troop” or “earth”.

Dream Data:

From the Wikipedia page on dreams:

The average person has about 3 to 5 dreams per night, but some may have up to 7 dreams in one night. The dreams tend to last longer as the night progresses. During a full 8-hour night sleep, two hours of it is spent dreaming. […] The earliest recorded dreams were acquired from materials dating back approximately 5000 years, in Mesopotamia, where they were documented on clay tablets.[5] In the Greek and Roman periods, the people believed that dreams were direct messages from the gods, or from the dead and that they predicted the future.

Fox Facts and Dream Data #2

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