Faerie Facts and the Lantern Lowdown #6

A little over three weeks left to send your faerie folk and/or lantern poems.

See #1, #2, #3,#4, and #5.

Faerie Facts

On the hidden people (from Wikipedia):

One common theme found among the Celtic nations describes a race of diminutive people who had been driven into hiding by invading humans. They came to be seen as another race, or possibly spirits, and were believed to live in an Otherworld that was variously described as existing underground, in hidden hills (many of which were ancient burial mounds), or across the Western Sea.[4]
In old Celtic fairy lore the sidhe (fairy folk) are immortals living in the ancient barrows and cairns. The Tuatha de Danaan are associated with several Otherworld realms including Mag Mell (the Pleasant Plain), Emain Ablach (the Fortress of Apples or the Land of Promise or the Isle of Women), and the Tir na nÓg (the Land of Youth).[34]

The concept of the Otherworld is also associated with the Isle of Apples, known as Avalon in the Arthurian mythos (often equated with Ablach Emain). Here we find the Silver Bough that allowed a living mortal to enter and withdraw from the Otherworld or Land of the Gods. According to legend, the Fairy Queen sometimes offered the branch to worthy mortals, granting them safe passage and food during their stay.

The Lantern Lowdown

On kerosene lamps (from Wikipedia):

The kerosene lamp (widely known in Britain as a paraffin lamp) is a type of lighting device that uses kerosene (British “paraffin”, as distinct from paraffin wax) as a fuel. Kerosene lamps have a wick and a glass chimney or globe; lamps may be used on a table, or hand-held lanterns may used for portable lighting. There are three types of kerosene lamp: traditional flat wick, central draught (tubular round wick), and mantle lamp. There are three types of kerosene lantern: Dead flame, hot blast, and cold blast.

[…]

The first description of a simple lamp using crude mineral oil was provided by al-Razi (Rhazes) in 9th century Baghdad, who referred to it as the “naffatah” in his Kitab al-Asrar (Book of Secrets).[1] In 1846 Abraham Pineo Gesner invented a substitute for whale oil for lighting, distilled from coal. Later made from petroleum, kerosene became a popular lighting fuel. Modern versions of the kerosene lamp were later constructed by the Polish inventor Ignacy Łukasiewicz in 1853 Lviv, and by Robert Edwin Dietz of the United States at about the same time.[2] The question regarding the primacy of these two inventors’ versions of the lamp remains unresolved.[3]

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5 thoughts on “Faerie Facts and the Lantern Lowdown #6

  1. the capture of faerie Dragon clouded Africa

    mark: 9:56 EDT

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